Article - Simple ghost hunting photographic tips

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This was originally written by Matt Burnham, however I spiced it up a bit. I just wanted to give credit where credit is due.

1) Avoid using a flash across from reflective objects - mirrors, metal objects, and so forth.

2) Be aware of your surroundings. If it is raining or dusty where your picture is taken, it will appear to have "orbs" all over the photo. Bright light can also cause "orbs". This is why much of the paranormal investigative world does not take orbs seriously at all any more - beware of people who do take it seriously.

3) Is that your camera strap in front of the lens or a vortex? If it's black or grey, looks like it might have stitch marks, it's almost certainly your camera strap. Nearly all of the so-called "vortex" photographs are obviously camera straps; so much so that often you can even tell that the strap loops down and back up to the camera.

4) Is something other than your camera strap very close to your flash? Anything hanging (low tree limbs, ropes, spider webs, etc) can reflect back as a "bright white energy" when shot at "point-blank" range.

5) When scanning your picture into the computer, try to use at least 150 dpi resolution. Less than that can make it difficult to discern what is in the shot. Keep an original scan on hand. When a computer is used to "sharpen" an image, digital artifacts can be inadvertantly added that were not in the original picture.

6) When looking at "energy" in a photo, look at the negative. Does the "energy" continue out of the frame? If so, you have a development error. This obviously does not apply to digital cameras, which is probably why it happens far less often with them.

7) Most importantly, be alert and objective. Most "paranormal" photographs can be explained as natural occurrences, reflections of light, and misinterpretations of everyday things. Try to eliminate as many of these factors as possible."
Category: Ghosts / Ghost Evidence
Tags: ghosts, photos, pictures
May 23 @ 02:11
Eric
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